Can’t you two just get along?

Guestpost by Sara Mansson

Last time, we talked about some day to day examples of things you can do to help your children learn good negotiation skills. One thing that helps children learn this is experiencing problems that need solving. One of our tips then was to wait and step back when your child lands in a discussion to allow them to solve it by themselves. But sometimes heated arguments break out even amongst the most skilled negotiators and when strong emotions, shouting and aggression start to play a role it might be better to step in. How can you help your children in the heat of the moment?

Upset negotiation fightCool down. When you notice the emotions running high and want to prevent a full escalation, or when a fight is already taking place, ask your children to take some time to breathe in and out, cool down, and count to ten. Following this, you can let each child state their points in a calm manner while the other has to listen.

Remind. When a negotiation involves an emotionally laden topic, emotions can run high, which in turn means negotiation skills drop. It can then be helpful to ask your children to take a step back and reflect on what their goal of the negotiation is, and reminding them to keep the tone of their voice as calm as possible when they have decided what to say. You can then give your child reminders on the tips you previously discussed regarding the mastering of their new negotiation skills.

Siblings negotiateSuggest. Sometimes children do not know how to solve the problem, which options other than ‘my way’ or ‘their way’ are available? Usually there are three more options: a mix of the two (first this, then the other), something else entirely (not A or B, but C) or nothing at all (agreeing to disagree, not playing with each other for now).

Obtaining the ability to successfully negotiate is a very important life skill for your children. Not only will it give you a calmer home environment, but it will also give your child insight into how to make their own wishes heard in a composed, mature manner but also how to listen to and consider their siblings’ views. Successful negotiation in which both parties are happy will leave your children feeling independent and confident.


 

Expat Child Psychology offers Social Skills 4 Kids group courses for children aged 9 to 12 which helps, among other things, to improve their problem solving skills.

Teaching your Child the Art of Negotiation

Guestpost by Sara Mansson

Sometimes arguments break out between our children and we wish we knew how to prevent them. Can’t they just listen to each other and compromise? The art of successful negotiation is a skill which is important to social situations throughout life; going far beyond agreeing on a movie to watch with the whole family. Negotiation involves abilities such as listening to others, expressing empathy, and to coming to a good compromise. Children practice these skills early in life such as by deciding what game to play with their friends or by coming to an agreement with their sibling about who should get to play with which new toy. Oftentimes this practicing is accompanied by loud arguments and even aggression between siblings or peers. How can you help them to learn peaceful negotiation skills?

Involve. The easiest way to introduce correct negotiation techniques to your child is to involve them. Good moments to involve your child in a negotiation could be when discussing what activities you should do for your family outing the upcoming weekend, or when discussing the family schedule to see if it is possible for your child to start karate classes like they asked to. The more exposure your child receives to useful methods, the more likely they are to remember and use them in the future! Involve your children in role-playing; allowing them to try debating from both sides of the negotiation.

Slower or faster - negotiation skillsExplain. When your child is involved in a family debate or is trying to reach a compromise with a sibling, it’s important that they are able to listen to the other’s point of view. Explain to your child that it is important to show that they have listened to and understood the other sibling. Give your child examples of how they can show this, such as by summarizing what the other has said or by asking relevant questions.

Agreeing vs. Arguing. Another point which is important to keep in mind about negotiation is teaching your child that they are trying to find common ground to agree on. This means that it is not a matter of winning or losing a battle – it’s a matter of bargaining and hearing both sides.

Parents fighting not negotiatingSet a good example. Examples are much more important for the learning of social skills than any of our best teaching methods will ever be. As a parent, you have to negotiate too sometimes. Perhaps with your children, but maybe with others; teachers, grandparents, shop keepers, your boss… When your child is near, they will observe and take in ‘how it is done’. Show your children how to negotiate by setting the right example for them.

Wait. While your children or your child and their friends start negotiating, try to step back and allow them to try and solve the problem amongst themselves. We all learn by trial and error, stepping in too soon might prevent your child from learning important lessons.

So what can you do when things do start getting out of hand? Read about it in our next blog!


 

Expat Child Psychology offers Social Skills 4 Kids group courses for children aged 9 to 12 which helps, among other things, to improve their problem solving skills.